We have prepared some psychoeducational materials on how to support yourself and people around you when facing crisis and disasters. There are also websites and mobile applications developed by different organizations you may visit and download mental health materials for self-care.

Psychoeducational Resources

For Disaster Survivors

When the Unexpected Comes

When the Unexpected Comes

Disasters or traumatic incidents can impact survivors psychologically to various degrees. The unexpected and extraordinary nature of the incident may induce a series of common physical and psychological reactions. This brochure introduces common reactions adults may experience after a disaster or traumatic incident, and the many methods to help with recovery.

Click here to download

Coping with the Unexpected – Helping Children and Adolescents through Accidents and Traumatic Events

Coping with the Unexpected – Helping Children and Adolescents through Accidents and Traumatic Events

Disasters and traumatic incidents affect not only adults, but also children. Children of different ages have different reactions to traumatic events. This brochure introduces common psychological responses of pre-school toddlers, school-age children and adolescents after traumatic events. It also advises adults on ways to help children who have experienced traumatic incidents.

Click here to download

For the Bereaved (Adult & Child)

Walking Together Through Grief

Walking Together Through Grief

It is normal to be sad and shocked when a loved one passes away. Sometimes, grief brings on physical, behavioural, cognitive, and emotional effects. This brochure introduces common grief reactions and some self-care methods to help the bereaved recover gradually and restore their life.

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孩子的哀傷封面

Children and Grief

When a loved one passes away, children, like adults, also experience grief and exhibit behavioural changes. This brochure lists common grief responses of children of different ages and provides tips on helping children grow from grief.

Click here to download

I Am Not Alone

I Am Not Alone

Children might not know how to express their feeling when a loved one passes away. This brochure is written for children and illustrates the grief responses they might be experiencing. It encourages them to accept and manage difficult emotions in ways they are comfortable with.

Click here to download

For First Responders and Healthcare Workers

Beyond Helping Others

Beyond Helping Others

During disasters or traumatic incidents, not only do the survivors and their families experience grief, but disaster workers may also be significantly affected. This brochure introduces common stress symptoms they may experience during or after disasters or traumatic incidents, and outlines the warning signs to seek professional help to alleviate long-term distress. It also illustrates methods for healthcare workers and relief work supervisors to effectively manage their stress before, during and after the aid work.

Click here to download

For those who are affected by a disaster

No matter who you are— disaster survivors or their family, disaster workers, or the public, you may experience various emotional responses upon the occurrence of a catastrophe. To prepare yourself for the sudden arrival of accidents, you can practice different stress management skills. One of the effective ways to attain a state of relaxation is to carry out breathing exercise:

  1. Sit on a comfortable chair or lie down in bed; bend your knees slightly.
  2. Put your hands either on your stomach or by the sides of your body.
  3. Try to relax your whole body. Imagine that you have a balloon in your stomach.
  4. Inhale to inflate the balloon and exhale to deflate it.
  5. Inhale deeply and slowly through your nose.
  6. Try to make your stomach bulge during inhalation.
  7. Exhale slowly through your mouth.
  8. Tighten your stomach muscle during exhalation and squeeze all the exhaust gases out.
  9. After every deep breath, maintain your regular breathing for about 10 seconds.
  10. Then repeat all the steps for deep breathing again.

Points to note:

  • You may sit down or lie down calmly after 6-7 times of deep breathing.
  • Maintain your natural breathing rhythms and bring your attention to observing the changes of your stomach as you breathe: during inhalation, your stomach will be rising gently; during exhalation, your stomach will be sinking gently.
  • Deliberate breathing is not needed. Just observe the changes of your stomach.
  • Spending about 10 minutes each time, practice this breathing exercise at least once a day. With regular practice, this is an effective way to achieve a relaxed state.

Other Websites & Mobile Applications

Website

Mobile Applications (Chinese only)

Application Developed by Application highlights
Counseline @MHAHK
「輔負得正」
The Mental Health Association of Hong Kong
  • Online counselling services
  • Mini game(s) promoting positive thinking
  • Self-tests on depression & stress
  • Community resources
newlife.330
新生 ● 身心靈
New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association
  • Introduction to mindfulness
  • Video resources to enhance mental well-being
  • News update on mindfulness workshops
Living with Heart
心 ● 活
Department of Psychology, CUHK
  • Courses to improve quality of life & mental health
Jockey Club TourHeart Project
賽馬會心導遊計劃
  • Department of Psychology, CUHK
  • New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association
  • StoryTaler
  • Self-assessment and recommended training
  • Evidenced-based, interactive exercises for emotional coping skills
  • Statistics to monitor mental well-being and training progress
  • Tips on caring for others
  • Latest research findings on mental wellness and mental illness stigma
  • Upcoming events